McIntyre case gives reason to pause

 

 

Rev. Thea Nietfeld and Bill Lucero

Rev. Thea Nietfeld and Bill Lucero

 

 

 

 

On Oct. 13th, after proceedings in Wyandotte County District court, Lamonte McIntyre was released from custody after serving 23 years on charges of murdering two persons.  The District Attorney agreed to the release calling it a case of “manifest injustice”.  McIntyre became the second person released in Kansas in two years due to exoneration after being convicted of first degree murder.

 

Murder victim family member, Bill Lucero, of Topeka, addressed the topic of error in our criminal justice system from a victim family perspective in a recent Topeka Capital Journal letter to the editor.

 

“…The wrongful conviction and imprisonment of Lamonte McIntyre is a sickening reminder of how our criminal justice system can be manipulated by one corrupt high-ranking police officer’s ulterior motives which, in combination with an unethical relationship during the trial, amounted to significant judicial misconduct.

 

There are many of us who have lost loved ones to murder and who oppose capital punishment if for no other reason than the fear of contributing to the execution of an innocent defendant….”

 

To read the full letter on the TCJ website click here.

 

Not in MY Name!

 

 

Dixon head shot

 

 

 

 

 

Celeste Dixon was originally a weak supporter of the death penalty. She lost her mom, Marguerite, to murder in Texas. What kept her going after her mom’s death was the promise of a trial and that they were seeking the death penalty.

 

Celeste attended the trial every day because she wanted the defendant to see the people left behind and their anger and rage. After the guilty verdict and the death sentence, her family was relieved. A juror told them he’d held out for death because it was “a comforting thing to do” for the family.

 

Over time, Celeste began to question the death penalty because of the impact of the prolonged anger it created in her. She became active in a prolife group while in college. She eventually realized that she could no longer support the death penalty. Celeste noted that once she began to oppose the death penalty, the DA in her mom’s case was less responsive to her.

 

Her mom’s murderer was executed 21 years after the crime. Despite the juror’s belief that execution would be comforting, Celeste did not experience it that way. The death penalty process ultimately did not help her with the tremendous loss she had suffered.

 

Her experience led her to conclude that capital punishment actually fails to help murder victim family members rebuild their lives.  Ms. Dixon shared her journey with attendees at the Coalition’s recent Abolition Conference in McPherson.

 

2017 Nominee Slate Announced

 

The Nominee Slate for this year’s annual meeting has been announced.

 

Officer Nominees term ending 2019:

Donna Schneweis – Chair
Robert Sanders- Secretary

 

Board of Directors term ending 2019:

Current directors:

Sister Therese Bangert
LaGretia Copp
Dalton Glasscock

New director:

Micah Kubic

 

Elections will take place at 1 p.m. on Saturday October 21st  at the Conference in McPherson.

 

Register today for the 2017 Abolition Conference!

Flyer 2017 Final

 

Join us at this informative conference!

Register today by emailing infoatksabolitiondotorg or by leaving a message at 785-235-2237.

The Kansas Death Penalty: What a Waste, 2017!

 

Join us in McPherson on Saturday Oct 21st for our annual meeting and abolition Conference!

 

Speakers include:

Roger Werholtz, retired Secretary of Kansas Department of Corrections

Celeste Dixon, murder victim family member

Carolyn McGinn, Kansas Senator, Chair of Senate Ways and Means

 

Time is 1:00 to 3:30 p.m.

Location is McPherson Church of the Brethren,  200 North Carrie.

 

This event is free and open to the public.

 

To register contact KCADP by email at infoatksabolitiondotorg or by calling 785-235-2237 and give us your name and address.  We hope you can join us!